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The San Antonio Orthopaedic Group Joins National Effort to STOP Sports Injuries

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(SAN ANTONIO) October 15, 2010 – The incidence of youth sports injuries has increased at an alarming rate and now account for an estimated two million injuries, 500,000 doctor visits and 30,000 hospitalizations every year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The CDC also says that nearly 30 million children and adolescents participate in youth sports and nearly 3.5 million children under the age of 14 receive medical treatment for sports injuries each year. Most importantly, perhaps, the CDC says that more than half of all sports injuries in children are preventable.

The increase in injuries is linked to two different factors; the first being the increased participation of children playing sports at younger and younger ages, and the second involves those who participate in year-round play.

In September of this year, The San Antonio Orthopaedic Group and SASports.com, joined with a national coalition of health care providers to promote an awareness campaign called the Sports Trauma and Overuse Prevention or STOP Sports Injuries.

The national program was created in early 2007 by the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine). Nationally, campaign partners include the, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the National Athletic Trainers Association American Association. The program focuses on prevention and education for coaches, parents, health providers and student athletes.

The San Antonio Orthopaedic Group is one of the area’s largest orthopaedic practices and the only local healthcare group to be an official supporter of this national program.

Our goal is to reach as many local parents, students, teachers, coaches, booster clubs and athletic directors as we can in order to help keep our kids safe. Our message is simple. The old adage, “No pain, no gain,” used with prior generations of athletes has changed to, “Listen to your body’s warning signals.” And everyone involved with youth sports can play a role.

The San Antonio Orthopaedic Group is dedicated to your health and supports the initiatives of the STOP program. Everyone involved with youth sports injuries can play a role in preventing injuries.

If you are a healthcare provider, student athlete, coach or parent, we encourage you to Take the Pledge to do YOUR part and participate in the movement by going to the link at visiting the TSAOG Website. Visitors to this site can learn more about the program, view podcasts, and discover injury prevention tips for the following sports and conditions:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cheerleading
  • Dance
  • Football
  • Gymnastics
  • Running
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball
  • Heat illness
  • Concussion
  • Overuse injury

For immediate diagnosis and treatment of an athletic injury, we welcome walk-ins at the OrthoNow Urgent Care Clinic located at The Orthopaedic Institute near Jones-Maltsberger and 281. You may also schedule an appointment by calling 210.804.5424. The OrthoNow Urgent Care Clinic offers extended hours and accepts most insurance plans.

If you wish to speak with one of our Sports Medicine Institute physicians regarding specific questions on the STOP program, you may visit the “Our Physicians” section of website for contact information at www.tsaog.com.

Dr. Brad Tolin is an orthopaedic surgeon with The San Antonio Orthopaedic Group. He specializes in arthroscopic and reconstructive surgery of the shoulder and knee, total knee and joint replacement; cartilage restoration procedures; and sports medicine.

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ABOUT THE SAN ANTONIO ORTHOPAEDIC GROUP
The San Antonio Orthopaedic Group was established in 1947 for the purpose of providing the highest quality of orthopedic, medical, and surgical care to the regional San Antonio community, surrounding areas, and beyond. Its board certified surgeons are experienced, skilled, and subspecialty trained to care for and treat the full range of musculoskeletal disorders, diseases, and injuries to the human body in the areas of adult reconstructive, arthroscopic surgery, hand foot and ankle, spine, sports, trauma and general orthopedics. 

Orthopaedic surgeons working to stem the rising tide of sports injuries

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Two San Antonio businesses are joining a national coalition that is seeking to reduce the number of youth sports injuries.

The San Antonio Orthopaedic Group and online youth sports magazine SASports.com are teaming up to promote the Sports Trauma and Overuse Prevention or STOP Sports Injuries campaign locally. STOP Sports Injuries was created in early 2007 by the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. Since then, local groups throughout the country have been signing on as partners.

The campaign provides information on how to reduce injuries as well as info on how playing safe and smart can actually enhance and extend a child’s athletic career. Across the United States, youth sports injuries have been growing. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 30 million children and adolescents are participating in youth sports and nearly 3.5 million children under the age of 14 receive some sort of medical treatment for sports injuries each year. An estimated half of these injuries are preventable.

Officials with San Antonio Orthopaedic Group and SASports.com say their goal is to reach as many local parents, students, teachers, coaches, booster clubs and athletic directors with better tips on how to keep young athletes safe.

“Youth sports injuries are a problem that we all can do something about,” says Brad Tolin, sports medicine surgeon with the San Antonio Orthopaedic Group. “Youth sports injuries are linked to two different factors. The first is the increased participation of children playing sports at younger and younger ages, and the second involves those who participate in year-round play. The old adage ‘No pain, no gain,’ used with prior generations of athletes needs to be tempered, with a shift to one that says, ‘listen to your body’s warning signals.’ ”

The San Antonio Orthopaedic Group will provide tip sheets and articles on sports injuries on its Web site and at the company’s seven clinics. SASports.com also will post information on its site. SASports.com has covered 130 high schools from San Antonio to Eagle Pass, from Beeville to Burnet and from Shiner to Cotulla since 2001.

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San Antonio orthopaedic surgeon to deliver Kessel Lecture at international congress

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Local orthopaedic surgeon Dr. Stephen Burkhart will be in Edinburgh, Scotland this week, at the invitation of the International Congress on Shoulder and Elbow Surgery (ICSES), to deliver the prestigious Kessel Lecture.

The International Congress is unique in that it showcases the latest views of thought leaders involved in shoulder and elbow surgery throughout the world, and it takes place only once every three years.

At the Congress there are instructional updates, symposia and workshops by the top surgeons in the shoulder and elbow world, and the Kessel Lecture is the cornerstone presentation of the entire Congress.

In his invitation letter to Dr. Burkhart, Professor W. Angus Wallace, president of this year’s organizing committee, called the committee’s selection of Dr. Burkhart, “unanimous,” and a “very fitting tribute to [Burkhart’s] most distinguished career in our specialty.”

Every three years ICSES is held in a different host city around the world. The first meeting was organized by Prof. Lipmann Kessell in London in 1980. Kessel was a successful surgeon based in London, and Emeritus Professor of Orthopaedics at the University of London.

Kessel is credited with organizing the first international conference on surgery of the shoulder in London in 1980. This conference is considered a landmark in defining shoulder surgery as a separate clinical entity.

Burkhart’s lecture, Expanding the Frontiers of Shoulder Surgery, takes a look at what he calls both the “challenging and exhilarating role that technology has had and will continue to have on shoulder surgery.” And Burkhart should know about technology and medicine.

The San Antonio based surgeon is credited as one of the first orthopedic surgeons in the world to use a technology known as athroscopy for the treatment of specific shoulder injuries. Arthroscopy is a surgical procedure orthopaedic surgeons use to visualize, diagnose, and treat problems inside a joint.

Burkhart said he was “humbled” by the invitation to speak to this prestigious international group. He said, “This is the largest assemblage of the top shoulder surgeons from around the world, all of whom are highly respected in the field, and it occurs only once every three years.” He continued, “This is the greatest professional honor of my career.”

Local Docs: Kids Are Overdoing Sports

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alarming increase in pediatric sports injuries called a ‘silent epidemic’

By Jim Forsyth

Tuesday, March 16, 2010

 

The number of childhood and teenaged sports injuries is skyrocketing to the point where orthopaedic surgeons call it a ‘silent epidemic,’ and they say it is due to the ‘alarming trend’ of young kids participating in sports year round, 1200 WOAI news reports.  

“It is certain something that we are seeing more frequently in the office nowadays,” says Dr. Casey Taber with the San Antonio Orthopaedic Group, the state’s leading practice for research and treatment into bone, muscular, and musculoskeletal injuries. 

 “They are using their bodies more than they probably should.”  

Doctors worry that overuse and traumatic joint and extremity injuries among adolescents are setting them up for a ‘lifetime of chronic pain.’ 

A report released at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons this past weekend suggests ‘mandated downtimes’ for young athletes.  

“More adolescents are participating in year-round sports without seasonal breaks,” the report says. “They are playing on multiple teams simultaneously. This increased exposure means there will continue to be growing numbers of significant musculoskeletal injuries, both traumatic and chronic overuse.”  

Dr. Taber sees it in his clinic, and he doesn’t like what he sees. 

 “You are starting to see some injuries nowadays that we didn’t see years ago,” Dr. Taber says.  

He says more and more, he encounters adolescents who are participating in year-round sports, and occasionally in several sports at once. 

“They are using their bodies more than they probably should,” he said.  “The only way to prevent that is to back off to some degree.” 

He says parents need to be aware that even young, strong, and physically fit young people can suffer chronic injuries by overuse. 

The report says ‘everyone wants to get to the top,’ but adds, “we have to look at this and say, are we pushing kids too hard?  We cannot wait for kids to reach the college level to modify their training, because by that time, it could be too late.’ 

Orthopaedic surgeons point out that college and pro sports governing bodies regulate how much practice, when practice can begin, and how many sports people can participate in, but frequently, there is none of that regulation at the grade school and high school level, where the potential for lifelong damage is the greatest.

 

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